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Mario Wants Us To Learn Our History And “Rewrite It”

Mario-Rewrite-It-VIBE-Interview-1594076099

The power of music cannot be denied. From Gil Scott Heron’s “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” to Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright,” a soul-stirring melody can galvanize the masses and uplift the spirits of those fighting against societal wrongs like racial injustice. That same energy can be channeled and molded into a soulful number with an impact just as powerful. Enter Mario‘s smooth single, “Rewrite It.”

After the bassline sets the song’s tempo and the lyric: “Got in a system that we ’bout to get out,” starts the first verse, you soon realize it’s a declaration—a melodic proclamation, encouraging our Black brothers and sisters to “uncover your eyes,” stand up together, and really see the power we have as a historically oppressed people. “Rewriting the hold damn history/ Rewriting the things that were taught to me,” he echoes over the pulsating chorus. “You see the whole damn world/ It’s time for us to rewrite it…Rewrite it, yeah, rewrite it.”

With movements like Black Lives Matter, it’s a stance many have expressed and can agree with. Peaceful protests and calls for change continue to happen around the world, and the Baltimore native has been using this time to not only further educate himself but to also do his part in the form of song. “I just wanted to use my voice and spread a powerful message,” he explains during VIBE’s Instagram Live Q&A. “I feel like for us, it’s another wake-up call. When I say us, I mean melanated people, whether you’re in the industry or not in the industry.”

The unjust killings of unarmed Black women and men like Breonna Taylor and George Floyd have truly caused a chain reaction of eye-opening conversations, learnings, and revelations by Black and non-Black people alike. If you were to ask Mario what the phrase “Black lives matter” means to him, he’d simply say, “It’s a call to action to study, to understand, to fight for what you believe in.”

He continues candidly, “It’s a call to action for us to unite more and do more things that will directly affect our communities. It’s a call to action for all of those people that are out there of many different races, fighting for the cause, to show them what our unity can do. It’s time for us to really be the change that we want to see.”

R&B Spotlight’s Cory Taylor sat with Mario to catch up with the multi-faceted creative about today’s climate around social justice, where he thinks the solution for change lies, and his upcoming Closer to Mars EP. Watch the full interview below.

On how he’s been during this pandemic and days of quarantine:

I’ve been doing nothing too different from what my normal daily life was like, meditating, definitely was doing a lot more yoga since I was home a lot. And just being healthy, man. I’ve always been health-conscious, but I just took it another step of studying more and reading a lot more. Just being kind to myself a lot more. Kind of stay and keep my anxiety at a low, because it’s just so much crazy energy out there right now. I think a lot of us are reacting right now, we’re reacting to what’s going on, but I think we also got to be proactive moving forward.

On coming up with the TikTok challenge for his single “Closer”:

I was bored in my backyard and one of my dancers came over. I’m like, “Dude, do this little routine to this record I just put out.” Then we just put it out as a TikTok challenge. People started doing it, then it started going crazy. We just had fun with it.

On the civil unrest around the killings of our Black brothers and sisters:

There are so many different levels of things that we need to fix. We need to focus on, of course, okay, defund the police. We need to focus on getting convictions, continue to get that. That needs to be our main focus, because at the end of the day. We need immediate convictions. We don’t need to be waiting three, four months. We don’t need to be.

On the other side of things, we’ve collectively got to start studying more. We’ve got to start saving our money. We’ve got to start building our own businesses, which there’s a lot of melanated-owned businesses out there. And we need to just start studying and reading more, and really understanding laws, and understanding what it is that we need.

One of the things that I’m passionate about, and that I want to start seeing more and speaking out more on is critical mass. When you have certain states that are majority melanated people, but then you have a lot of white people in office that are making the choices. We need to be making choices when we’re the majority because we know what we need.

On career goals outside of music:

I can’t wait until people really get a chance to really know me outside of what they know, because I create across the board—I’m a writer, I’m an actor, I’m a singer, I’m a performer, but I’m just a creative. And it’s something that I’ve really been investing in, my time, so I’m looking forward to sharing this. Y’all going to see movies one day, whether it be Netflix or other platforms that make sense for it. And when y’all see the credits, and y’all see that I’m behind it, you’re going to be like, “What?! We had no idea this guy was…” (Smiles) You know what I’m saying? So I’m really excited about that because it’s just going to show that we can do anything.

On working on the set of Empire:

It was inspirational to see that a show could last six seasons and still be in the millions, the audience. As a creator, that’s a creative’s wish. You’re working with Terrence, working with Taraji. The fact that we can have that level of success in film. You have multiple, different cultures and people coming throughout the show. It has so many different people. If you look at the cast list over the six years, what it did, it just lets you know how powerful art is, how powerful creativity is. I loved working with Terrence. I learned a lot from him as an actor. Taraji, shout out to the DMV. She’s doing some really powerful things in the mental health space.

On his upcoming endeavors as the country is in quarantine:

Mariovip.com is the site I just started, and so I’m going to be doing virtual tours. I’ve got new merch that I’m putting out called “The Big Payback,” that’s about to be lit. I’m giving back to a lot of communities and melanated-owned businesses, and just inspiring personal economic growth. But yeah, man, we about to be back out here.

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The Musical ‘Exodus’ Of Brian McKnight

 

With every grand entry, there usually comes a grand closing. In the case of R&B veteran Brian McKnight, it’s no surprise that he has decided to end his 20-album run of compilations with his latest studio album, Exodus. Although McKnight doesn’t consider this the end of his musical career, the singer-songwriter has decided to use this time to redirect his energy and time to truly living life and pursuing other endeavors.

“It’s not really retirement. It’s that I think that I’ve said everything I need to say as far as original music is concerned,” he says in an on-camera interview with VIBE. “And it’s funny because I have friends of mine that are calling like, so you’re not writing for yourself and well, can I have those songs that you’re going to write that you’re not going to use?

“I’m like, sure. So that’s another way to go, writing songs for other people. I just, there’s so many other things that I want to do. I want to wake up every day and my wife and I just do whatever makes us happy.”

With his single Earl Cohen-produced “Nobody” and 12 other signature, love tunes on the tracklist, Exodus serves as a solid body of work. The inspiration behind is last album of original work? The love of his life—his wife, Leilani—who he randomly crossed paths with at an event he was attending.

“I think the thing that people need to realize is that when you meet someone and all you want to do is give of yourself to them, then it’s no longer about you.”

Watch our full interview with McKnight where he talks about his new album, how he’s been managing the new normal, quarantine life, why he’s been able to stand the test of time and that thing called love.

On his own experience with police as a Black man:

I remember what it was like in the seventies. I remember what it was like in the eighties, in the nineties. I can remember getting pulled over. I mean, as recently as August being pulled over in my own neighborhood, driving an expensive car that a police officer pulled us over, just to see if I was the person that was supposed to be driving that car. Now, it didn’t go past that because he realized who I was. But my wife not being black and now learning that she is black now that she’s with me. It was something that was foreign to her. And I had to explain to her that this is what it’s like to be a black man. And it’s sad that that’s what we have to grow up with. But at the same time, I think that now we’re seeing that because of social media. I remember when Rodney King happened, It was pretty much on the news. It was the news. But now the whole world, because of social media, can see that things aren’t as good as we thought they were.

On whether he ever finds himself worried about his sons getting pulled over by police:

I think that what we have to do as parents is also to educate those that although something may not be fair, although something may not be the exact way you want it to be that, it’s hard to say this and I don’t want to get any flack for it, but sometimes it’s better. And this isn’t anything to just turn the other cheek and do what you got to do and stay alive at the same time.

On his cover of a song by Sting:

I did a cover for the first time in a long time. I very rarely talk about how much Sting has influenced me and I wanted to do something to show him the homage that I haven’t shown him. And I covered his song “Fragile” because I think that song really speaks to what I’m trying to talk about as far as how we treat one another. That it’s fragile, what we have here. And let’s not take it to the point of breaking. We can bend, we have bent, we’ve been bending, but let’s turn that thing around. And get back straight again.

On how his love for his wife inspired his album:

Since I met my wife, she has been the subject of every song I’ve written. And the funny thing about that is I’d never written anything about anyone. I’d never cared about anyone. I didn’t know love on any level till I met the love of my life when I was 42 years old. And I never believed in it. I know I wrote about it extensively. I know that I was the love man from Borneo when it comes to music, but I was really just faking it. I had listened to a lot of songs and I knew a lot of music and I could take from a book or I can take from a movie. This is the first time in my life where actual personal experience is coming out in the music. And it’s all because all I have to do is look at my wife, be around her, and she is the essence of everything that I want to say, everything that I want to be. And it’s a wonderful thing to wake up every morning with the most beautiful woman who ever lived.

On advice to himself as a new artist starting out:

The advice I would say to him is, is that when you’re 42 you’re going to meet a woman that’s going to change your life. You need to wait on everything till then. Don’t waste your time doing anything but counting the days until she shows up, because that’s when you’re going to start to live. That’s when your life is going to become everything you want it to be, period.

On who he’d take part in Verzuz battle/celebration with:

To me, the verses battles aren’t necessarily about going up against each other. It’s about the celebration of the music. And there are several artists. I think Joe and I could do a great Verzuz because I’m such a fan of him.

Stream Brian’s Exodus album on Apple MusicSpotify, or Tidal.

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Nick Cannon Dropped By ViacomCBS, Accused Of Promoting “Hateful Speech”

Build Presents Nick Cannon Discussing His New Movie "King of the Dancehall"

The Wild ‘N Out host said that he does not condone “hateful rhetoric.”

ViacomCBS has parted ways with Nick Cannon amid backlash over a podcast interview where he talked about the “power of melanated people,” and called White people “true savages.”

Cannon, who referenced Min. Louis Farrakhan and referred to Black people as the “true Hebrews,” was called anti-semitic after a clip of the podcast interview with Public Enemy’s Professor Griff circulated the web on Tuesday (July 14).

“ViacomCBS condemns bigotry of any kind and we categorically denounce all forms of anti-Semitism. We have spoken with Nick Cannon about an episode of his podcast ‘Cannon’s Class’ on YouTube, which promoted hateful speech and spread anti-Semitic conspiracy theories,”  the company said in a statement to The Hollywood Reporter.

“While we support ongoing education and dialogue in the fight against bigotry, we are deeply troubled that Nick has failed to acknowledge or apologize for perpetuating anti-Semitism, and we are terminating our relationship with him.”

In a lengthy follow-up statement posted on his social media accounts, Cannon denounced hate speech. “Anyone who knows me knows that I have no hate in my heart or malice intentions. I do not condone hate speech nor the spread of hateful rhetoric,” he wrote. “We are living in a time when it is more important than ever to promote understanding.”

Cannon added that the Black and Jewish communities have both faced oppression, prejudice, and persecution for ”thousands of years,” and continue to work to “overcome these obstacles.” He went on to state that “African Americans and The people of the Jewish community” have collaborated on “some of the best, most revolutionary work we know today.”

The radio personality said that he advocates for “people’s voice to be heard openly fairly and candidly,” and encouraged continued education in “today’s conversations about anti-racism and social justice.” He also welcomed experts, clergymen, and others to hold him accountable and correct any of his statements that have been “projected as negative.”

In the meantime, Cannon said that he’s holding himself accountable and takes “full responsibility” for his words. “Because MY intentions are to only show that as a beautiful human species we have way more commonalities than differences.”

Check below for Cannon’s full statement, and podcast episode.

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Jada Pinkett Smith Confirms Past Relationship With August Alsina

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The Smiths sat down for a special episode of ‘Red Table Talk.’

As promised, Jada Pinkett Smith brought herself to the infamous red table but she wasn’t alone. Will Smith joined his wife to address August Alsina’s claims in a special mini-episode of Red Table Talk that premiered on Friday (July 10).

Jada confirmed that she was once in a relationship with the 27-year-old singer while “separated” from Will. According to Jada, things with Alsina started out as a platonic friendship before turning into something more.

“As time went on, I got into a different kind of entanglement with August,” she admitted.

The actress went on to clarify that Will never August “permission” to date her. “The only person that can give permission in that particular circumstance is myself,” she said. “I could see how he would perceive it as ‘permission’ because we were separated amicably and I think he also wanted to make it clear that he’s not a home wrecker — which he’s not.

“I was in a lot of pain. I was broken. I definitely realized that you can’t find happiness outside of yourself, and luckily enough, you and I were going through a process of healing in a much different manner,” Jada told Will. “I would definitely say we did everything we could to get away from each other only to realize that that wasn’t possible.”

Later in the talk, Will asked Jada what she was looking for in August. “I just wanted to feel good,” she said. “And it was really a joy just to heal somebody.”

The couple, who have been together for 25 years, also revealed their relationship mantra: “We ride together. We die together. Bad marriage for life.”

Watch the full episode below.

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Prince

Prince

He made such  a great songs , worked with a lot of artists including Alicia Keys , Madonna , Tevin Campbell , Jay-Z , Beyonce ,  Celine Dion and wrote for them many songs , and had his own film called ” Purple Rain” .

I love comedians who imitate  Prince :

Image result for prince

 

Here’s more ’bout him :

Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, record producer, actor, and director.

Born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Prince was known for his electric work, flamboyant stage presence, extravagant fashion sense and use of makeup, and wide vocal range. His innovative music integrated a wide variety of styles, including funkrockR&Bnew wavesoulpsychedelia, and pop. He sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time. He won eight Grammy Awards, six American Music AwardsGolden Globe Award, and an Academy Award for the 1984 film Purple Rain.He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004.

Prince developed an interest in music as a young child and wrote his first song at the age of seven. He signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. Records at the age of 17, and released his debut album For You in 1978. His 1979 album Prince went platinum, and his next three records—Dirty Mind (1980), Controversy (1981), and 1999 (1982)—continued his success, showcasing his prominently explicit lyrics and blending of funk, dance, and rock music. In 1984, he began referring to his backup band as the Revolution and released Purple Rain, the soundtrack album to his film debut. It quickly became his most critically and commercially successful release, spending 24 consecutive weeks atop the Billboard 200[9] and selling over 20 million copies worldwide. After releasing the albums Around the World in a Day (1985) and Parade (1986), The Revolution disbanded, and Prince released the double album Sign o’ the Times (1987) as a solo artist. He released three more solo albums before debuting The New Power Generation band in 1991.

In 1993, while in a contractual dispute with Warner Bros., he changed his stage name to an unpronounceable symbol (Ƭ̵̬̊), also known as the “Love Symbol”, and began releasing new albums at a faster rate to remove himself from contractual obligations. He released five records between 1994 and 1996 before signing with Arista Records in 1998. In 2000, he began referring to himself as “Prince” again. He released 16 albums after that, including the platinum-selling Musicology (2004). His final album, Hit n Run Phase Two, was first released on the Tidal streaming service on December 2015. Five months later, at the age of 57, Prince died of an accidental fentanyl overdose at his Paisley Park recording studio and home in Chanhassen, Minnesota.

SpouseManuela Testolini (m. 2001–2006), Mayte Garcia (m. 1996–2000) .

For more information : Prince

Official Website : https://www.officialprincemusic.com/

Here’s Some of his music :